About the caption

Over the yeras Cecilia Rooth (in the middle) has taught many forest owners how to use chainsaws and brush cutters. In the caption also the Södra members Cinna Béen (at the left) and Camilla Logarn (at the right).

 

Cecilia held the first chainsaw licence study circle organised by Södra. Ten women from the Grenverket women's network took part.

"Ever since, I have continued to promote increased safety in southern Swedish forests," said Cecilia. Over the years, there have been many courses given as part of Säker Skog (Safe Forestry) and Vuxenskolan (the Adult Educational Association), as both an instructor and an examiner.

Intensive periods

When Cecilia started as an instructor, she held a few courses each year, which soon evolved into more and more.
"At times, I have worked very intensively with courses. Often, 3–4 times a week and with examinations on the weekend."

When the safety courses started, there was a suppressed demand among forest owners. When the legal requirement was introduced, demand increased further.
"More recently, demand has ebbed slightly, but there is a steady flow of new forest owners wanting to learn how to work safely and ergonomically. We are a total of 12 instructors in Södra's district, who work with safety training."

No problem

Even if many women have completed the training, in women only and in mixed groups, most of the participants have been men.
"Initially, as a woman, I thought it would be difficult for me to train men," admitted Cecilia. "At its core, it's about how to use a chainsaw. But it's gone pretty smoothly. Sometimes, I have had to be pretty tough, but when I've shown what I'm capable of, I have always won the participants' trust and respect. And the participants have always been great."

Prevented accidents

Cecilia stresses how enjoyable she finds teaching and sharing her skills. She also feels that the courses have been of great benefit.
"Over the years, I'm sure we have prevented many accidents and stupid mistakes," she said. The participants learn to think first before acting, they also learn the technical dos and don'ts to reduce risk.

Cecilia is also involved in other types of courses and education. At home in Flakulla, she teaches students from Linnæus University about oak forests and their management. She also sits on the Board of Ekfrämjandet, an association with interests that include teaching how to manage broadleaved forests and to cross-cut large oak logs, and promoting interest in deciduous forests as well as maintaining oak and other hardwood forests.